4 Things You Should Do When Raising Bilingual And Multilingual Kids

Wondering about the World

We have all heard how kids are brilliant at learning new languages. Their brains are wired to do just so and the earlier they learn a new language, the greater the likelihood they will achieve native status in it. But if it’s so easy for them to learn, then why don’t more children speak multiple languages? Why do so many second and third generation children of immigrants not speak the native language of their parents?

The short answer is that it’s hard work. It may be easy for a child to learn, but being a parent who facilitates the learning takes great effort and dedication! (If you want to know some of my reasons for why I have chosen to raise my children to be bilingual, click here).

Learning languages is a complex process and there’s no easy trick to make your kids magically learn. However, I have a list of 4 things you should do when raising your children to be bilingual or multilingual. If these conditions are met, your kids are bound to learn.

Talk To Them – A Lot

Seriously, ‘til your throat hurts. If you want to raise your child(ren) to be multilingual you have to provide exposure and opportunities to use the languages. Children learn language from observing the world around them and the first place they will learn is at home. Parents are a child’s first and most important teachers and we have a great influence on what and how they will learn. So, how can you best teach your young child? You have to speak a lot. You should be talking to your child about everything they do and see and everything that you do. This is how they learn vocabulary and sentence structure. I read a great blog in which the author talks about filling up her child’s language bucket, and I think that’s a fantastic metaphor! (Check out her blog post here) If by the time you have spent a few hours with your young child your throat isn’t sore, you probably haven’t been doing your job.

Read To Them

One of the best things you can do for your child is read to them. If you read 20 minutes a day to your child, they will be exposed to 1.8 million words a year! Reading will not only help your child with the development of several languages, but it will help you practice your language skills and it will stir up topics for continued conversation. It is also a great time to connect with your child. After all, connecting is what language is all about.

Community Engagement

One important indicator for multi-lingual success is the influence of the community on the language. If children live in a community that supports their bilingualism, they are much more likely to be successful. We need to make it necessary for children to speak with the target language, because simply using it at home with mom or dad won’t be enough.

Family, friends and playgroups are all great support groups. Increasingly you can find pre-schools, language immersion programs, or weekend language schools in the target language. Other great sources for language learning are religious and cultural centers, as many Churches, Mosques, and Temples want to preserve heritage and languages too.

You can also combine activities and interests. Try to find classes and instructors for activities that your children enjoy that are taught in the target language. Maybe a dance teacher who will work with your child in Spanish, a music teacher who might speak Mandarin, or an art instructor who will work with your child in Romanian. Research the internet and social media, because you may find someone who can combine the skills that are important to you and your child.

Music, Videos & Apps

 Technology is miraculous. Let’s take advantage of it! Never before have we had access to as much music in different languages as we do now. Children, teenagers, and adults absolutely love music, so lets use it.  There are also many videos and apps that are made specifically for children to learn and practice language. Some are better than others, so please do your homework. Take the time to read reviews, ask people, and even play the games. It’s also a great idea to play the games with your children or watch when they play in order to see how they are benefiting and how you can build upon what they are learning.

Technology is not a replacement for human interaction, but it can be a great support system for our language learning goals. If you are interested in learning about our Spanish Safari App, check us out!

Keep in mind, language learning is not a sprint, but a marathon. It takes a lifetime to learn, so encourage your children to be lifelong learners. You may have set-backs and perhaps you won’t be able to do all of the above, but don’t give up. The project is well worth the effort!

What conditions do you think need to be met in order for a child to learn multiple languages? I would love to hear from you in the comments!

Besos,

Keli
Lead Spanish Teacher
[email protected]

3 Reasons Why I Chose to Raise My Children Bilingual

Little girl

I have two beautiful daughters and like every parent, I want the very best for them. I love them wholeheartedly and my dreams for them are big. However, with so many options available to parents at the tip of our fingers, all the “good things” that I MUST do for them are sometimes overwhelming! But the reality is that each one of us has to pick and choose our battles and know that even though we as parents won´t be perfect, our children will be just fine.

One battle I did choose is to raise my two girls to be bilingual. Below is a summary of some of my thoughts and research which went into my decision.

1. Children’s Amazing Brains (They CAN Be Bilingual!)

We know that children have wonderful, beautiful, spectacularly amazing brains! Have you ever watched your child and been astonished at all of the new things they are constantly learning? It seems like every day they point out something new and I am left wondering where they learned it.

It’s because babies are born ready to learn and one of the things they are wired to learn is language. We don’t actually have to teach our children to speak. They learn how to do so from observing and mimicking the world around them. While they are young, they have the capability to distinguish between and learn several languages using the exact same techniques.

Introducing a new language early increases the likelihood of children speaking like a native. However, it is never too late to begin learning a second language and the benefits are enormous.

2. Ongoing Brain Development

Learning more than one language can increase the size of the brain and it can also improve how the brain functions. In fact, research shows that people who speak multiple languages are better at standardized tests, planning and decision making, switching between tasks, understanding others and listening. They have better memories, impulse control, they are more creative and are better able to focus.

There was a time when people worried that teaching children more than one language would cause language delays and confusion. The science, however, has shown that this could not be farther from the truth. Learning a second (or third) language can actually give your brain a really good workout! In fact, studies even show that speaking multiple languages can stave off Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia in later life. The benefits of “working out your brain” with a second language are effective whether you started young or you are learning it as an adult.

3. Cultural Awareness

As I mentioned above, there was a time when teaching children a second language was thought to confuse them. Parents were discouraged from doing so and unfortunately many cultural ties were broken as a result of this misconception.

I was born in Venezuela and moved to the United States when I was eleven. I was raised in a bilingual environment, with my father speaking to me and my siblings in Spanish, and my mother in English. I want to ensure my daughters have a connection to their roots and I am re-creating the environment in which I grew up. I want them to learn Spanish, not just because of the cognitive benefits and the opportunities that it will open for them, but also so they can experience the rich cultural histories shared by Spanish speakers all over the world.

Learning about the world and developing empathy for other cultures is one of the biggest benefits of learning a second language. It’s the gateway to communicate with others and enables us to gain a deeper understanding of the world we share together. However, even if you do not speak a second language; I strongly encourage families to learn a new language together. Adults and children will definitely benefit from the experience.

Helping children to learn another language is not an easy task. It takes commitment, effort, and resources. That is why I am part of the Learn Safari Team. We are dedicated to helping children learn Spanish in a fun and interactive way. You can check out our unique application at www.learnsafari.com.

If you want to read up on some of the research on children and bilingualism, check the following links out: http://www.cal.org/earlylang/benefits/research_notes.html http://www.bbc.com/news/health-24446292 http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121008082953.htm http://bebrainfit.com/brain-benefits-learning-second-language/)memory http://bebrainfit.com/brain-benefits-learning-second-language/

Besos,
Keli
Lead Spanish
Teacher [email protected]